Title of document: FARMER RESEARCH NETWORKS AS A STRATEGY FOR MATCHING DIVERSE OPTIONS AND CONTEXTS IN SMALLHOLDER AGRICULTURE.

Authors: REBECCA NELSON, RICHARD COE, and BETTINA I. G. HAUSSMANN

Ministry/Government Agency/Organisation: School of Integrative Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; World Agroforestry Center, Nairobi, Kenya and Statistics for Sustainable Development, UK and Institute of Plant Breeding, Seed Science and Population, Genetics, University of Hohenheim, Germany

Year of publication: 2015

Geographic focus: Global level

Summary:

The agricultural research and development institutions in most developing countries are poorly equipped to support the needs of millions of smallholder farmers that depend upon them. The research approaches taken by these systems explicitly or implicitly seek simple, one-size-fits-all solutions for problems and opportunities that are extremely diverse. Radical change is needed to facilitate the agroecological intensification of smallholder farming. We propose that large-scale participatory approaches, combined with innovations in information and communications technology (ICT), could enable the effective matching of diverse options to the wide spectrum of socio-ecological context that characterize smallholder agriculture. We consider the requirements, precedents and issues that might be involved in the development of farmer research networks (FRNs). Substantial institutional innovation will be needed to support FRNs, with shifts in roles and relationships amongst researchers, extension providers and farmers.Where farmers’ organizations have social capital and strong facilitation skills, such alignmentsmay be most feasible. Novel information management capabilities will be required to introduce options and principles, enable characterization of contexts, manage data related to option-by-context interactions and enable farmers to visualize their findings in useful and intelligible ways. FRNs could lead to vastly greater capacity for technical innovation, which could in turn enable greater productivity and resilience, and enhance the quality of rural life.